Wednesday, February 7, 2001

Magic Dirt: What Are Rock Stars Doing Today

"Some critics have welcomed Magic Dirt's change from ``endless feedback, dirges and `arty' soundscapes'' (Rave magazine, Brisbane). After listening to my copy of the band's 1996 Friends in Danger album, I have to disagree... The latest album clearly builds on the earlier material."


What Are Rock Stars Doing Today
Magic Dirt
Warner Music

Magic rock'n'roll

GEELONG — Local band Magic Dirt have produced a brilliant album of dreamy but catchy pop-leaning songs. It's the best new rock'n'roll I've heard in years.

Some critics have welcomed Magic Dirt's change from ``endless feedback, dirges and `arty' soundscapes'' (Rave magazine, Brisbane). After listening to my copy of the band's 1996 Friends in Danger album, I have to disagree. The songs back then were quite beautiful — longer, with more instrumental parts, and a more anxious or angry mood. The latest album clearly builds on the earlier material.

Plenty of bands are playing pop grunge music but few with the beauty and character of Magic Dirt. The band has developed a distinct and original sound.

The songs are catchy and very listenable. The depth of feeling in the sweet-sad melodies of singer Adalita remains. The band weaves in all the elements of their earlier sound.

I've been impressed by Magic Dirt's musical contribution to the community over the years. Although reasonably popular, they haven't stopped playing local gigs at pubs and surf clubs, and the occasional benefit (I last saw them at a Jabiluka Action Group benefit). They don't play political music, but the commitment is there: just look at the list of environmental and animal welfare organisations' web sites in the CD cover.

The verdict is: if you like rock 'n' roll, listen to this!

Originally published in
Green Left Weekly issue 435 7 February 2001

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